E Countries – Recipes

Ethiopia
(recipes borrowed from the cooks at: www.whats4eats.com and www.interlog.com)

Yetakelt W’et (spicy mixed vegetable stew)

  • 1 c Onions; finely chopped
  • 2 Garlic cloves; minced
  • 1 T Berbere
  • 1 T Sweet Hungarian paprika
  • ¼ c Niter Kebbeh
  • 1 c Green beans; cut into thirds
  • 1 c Carrots; chopped
  • 1 c Potatoes; cubed
  • 1 c Tomatoes; chopped
  • ¼ c Tomato paste
  • 2 c Vegetable stock
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • ¼ c Parsley; fresh, chopped
  • 2 Batches Injera
  • Plain yogurt or cottage cheese

Saute the onions, garlic, berbere, and paprika in the Niter Kebbeh for 2 minutes. Add the beans, carrots, and potatoes and continue to sauté for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent burning. Add the chopped tomatoes, tomato paste, and the vegetable stock. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 15 minutes, or until all of the vegetables are tender. Add salt and pepper to taste and mix in the parsley. Serve with injera and yogurt or cottage cheese following the same serving and eating procedure as for Yemiser W’et. Servings: 6. Note: Try making this dish and Yemiser W’et for the same meal. In Ethiopia, it is customary to offer several stews at one time, and people eat some of each kind.

Yemiser W’et (spicy lentil soup)

  • 1 c Dried brown lentils
  • 1 c Onion; finely chopped
  • 2 Cloves garlic; minced
  • ¼ c Niter Kebbeh
  • 1 t Berbere
  • 1 t Cumin seeds; ground
  • 1 t Paprika; sweet Hungarian
  • 2 c Tomato; finely chopped
  • ½ c Tomato paste
  • 1 c Vegetable stock or water
  • 1 c Green peas; fresh or frozen
  • Salt to taste
  • Black pepper; fresh, to taste
  • 3 Batches Injera bread
  • Plain yogurt or cottage cheese

Rinse and cook the lentils. Meanwhile sauté the onions and garlic in the niter kebbeh, until the onions are just translucent. Add the berbere, cumin, and paprika and sauté for a few minutes more, stirring occasionally to prevent burning. Mix in the chopped tomatoes and tomato paste and simmer for another 5 to 10 minutes. Add 1 cup of vegetable stock or water and continue simmering. When the lentils are cooked, drain them and mix them into the sauté. Add the green peas and cook for another 5 minutes. Add salt and black pepper to taste. To serve Yemiser W’et, spread layers of injera on individual plates. Place some yogurt or cottage cheese alongside a serving of w’et on the injera and pass more injera at the table. To eat, tear off pieces of injera, fold it around bits of stew, and, yes, eat it with your fingers. Servings: 8

Doro Wat (Ethiopian chicken stewed in red pepper paste)

  • 2 lbs Chicken, leg and thighs, skinless
  • 1 Lemon juice only
  • 2 t Salt
  • 2 Onions chopped
  • 3 cloves Garlic, crushed
  • 1 T Gingerroot, peeled, chopped
  • ¼ c Oil, butter or niter kibbeh
  • 2 T Paprika
  • ¼ to ½ c Bebere paste
  • ¼ c Red Wine
  • ¾ c Water or Stock
  • ¾ c Salt & Pepper to taste
  • ½ to 2 t Cayenne Pepper
  • Option 4 Eggs hard-boiled

Mix together the chicken pieces, lemon juice and salt and in a large, non-reactive bowl and set aside to marinate for about 30 minutes. While the chicken is marinating, puree the onions, garlic and ginger in a food processor or blender. Add a little water if necessary. Heat the oil, butter or niter kibbeh in a large pot over medium flame. Add the paprika and stir in to color the oil and cook the spice through, about 1 minute. Do not burn. Stir in the berbere paste and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes. Add the onion-garlic-ginger puree and saute until most of the moisture evaporates and the onion cooks down and loses its raw aroma, about 5 to 10 minutes. Do not allow the mixture to burn. Pour in the water or stock and wine and stir in the chicken pieces, cayenne to taste, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 45 minutes. Add water as necessary to maintain a sauce-like consistency. Add the whole hard boiled eggs and continue to cook for another 10 to 15 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through and very tender. Adjust seasoning and serve hot with injera bread or rice. Servings: 4-6

###

Estonia
(recipes borrowed from the cooks at: nami-nami.blogspot.com)

Syrniki aka curd cheese patties  (Sõrnikud)

  • 500 g curd cheese
  • 2 egg yolks (or 1 egg, if you wish)
  • 60 g plain flour (100 ml), or slightly more, if necessary
  • a generous pinch of salt
  • 1 Tbsp sugar (for sweet syrniki)
  • flour for breading
  • oil for frying

Combine curd cheese, egg yolks, salt and sugar, if using.

Sprinkle some flour on the work surface and on your hands. Form small patties from the curd cheese mixture (add a spoonful or two of flour, if the mixture is too loose), flatten them slightly. The curd cheese patties should be about 1 cm thick.

(You could put them into the fridge for about and hour – it helps them to stay in shape).

Heat some oil on a frying pan over moderate heat. Fry the syrniki on both sides for 3-5 minutes, until they’re golden brown. Serve when still warm.  Serves 4

Oven-baked potato wedges with caraway seeds

Take your favorite roasting potato (I use a local variety, Laura, which has a thin pink skin and dark yellow flesh – Estonians like their potatoes to be yellow, not white inside), scrub very clean and cut lengthwise into wedges (four is plenty). Place into an oven tray, preferably large enough to snugly fit the potatoes in one layer. Drizzle generously with oil (and give them a good stir, so they’d be covered with oil), season with sea salt and caraway seeds.

Bake for 35-45 minutes (the timing really depends on the size and variety of your chosen potato) at 200 C/400 F, until the potato wedges are soft inside and crisp & brown outside and a lovely smell of caraway seeds has filled your kitchen. Sprinkle with some extra sea salt, if necessary.

Serve as a side dish with some meat, or simply dip them into some nice sour cream. Mmmmmm….

Estonian Shashlik Recipe  (Traditsiooniline šašlõkk)

  • 1 kg pork shoulder
  • 4 large onions
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 2 Tbsp vinegar (30% proof)
  • 2 tsp finely ground salt
  • 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp caster sugar

Cut the pork shoulder into thick slices (about 1,5-2 cm), then into small chunks, sized about 4×4 cm. Place into a large bowl.

Peel the onions and cut into thin slices. Add to the bowl with crushed garlic, salt, pepper and sugar. Sprinkle the vinegar on top.

Now – wearing a pair of kitchen gloves – massage the meat and onion rings for about 10-15 minutes, so the onion juices are released and the seasonings are firmly massaged into the meat chunks. Instead of dark red (as above), the meat should look much paler now. Cover the bowl and leave to marinate for 24 hours.

Pierce the meat chunks into a skewer and cook over hot coals until fully cooked and dark brown outside. (Sorry, I cannot give more accurate timings here – it all depends on your cooking vehicle).

Traditional side dishes would include freshly boiled new potatoes, a cucumber and tomato salad with some sour cream (but a coleslaw would work as well) and some ketchup. Serves 4 to 6, depending on the amount of side dishes

Redcurrant Meringue Pie (Beseekattega punasesõstrakook)

Pastry:

  • 130 g plain/all-purpose flour (250 ml/1 cup)
  • 30 g oats (100 ml)
  • 2 Tbsp sugar
  • 125 cold butter, cut into cubes
  • 2 Tbsp cold water

Filling:

  • 250 g sour cream
  • 3 Tbsp caster sugar
  • grated zest of half a lemon
  • 150 g redcurrants, cleaned (1 cup)
  • 1 Tbsp potato starch or cornflour

Meringue topping:

  • 2 large egg whites
  • 85 g caster sugar (100 ml)

Pastry: mix the dry ingredients, add cubed butter and pulse couple of times, until the mixture is fine and crumbly. Add the water, pulse again briefly. Press the mixture into a dough, then use your fingers and press the dough into a 26 cm pie dish.

Place to rest in a fridge for 30 minutes, then blind bake at 200 C for 15 minutes. Reduce the heat to 175 Celsius. Mix sour cream, sugar and grated lemon zest, spread on pre-baked pie base.

Gently mix potato starch/cornflour with the cleaned redcurrants and sprinkle on top of the cream layer.

Whisk egg whites and sugar until thick and white, then spread over the filling (or, for an even prettier effect, use a piping bag).

Bake at 175 C oven for about 15 minutes, until the meringue is light golden brown.

###

Eritrea
(recipe borrowed from the cooks at: www.eritra.be)

Tsebhi derho (spicy chicken)

  • 3 Medium size onions, chopped
  • 50 cc chili paste (berbere)
  • 50 cc tegelese tesmi (herbed butter)
  • 1 teaspoon chopped ginger
  • 1 teaspoon chopped garlic
  • 2 spoons lemon juice
  • 2 spoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 4 large tomatoes, peeled
  • 1 kilo chicken
  • 6 hard boiled eggs (peeled)
  • pepper and salt to taste

Cut the chicken into pieces and drain them well. Sprinkle the pieces with a mixture of the lemon juice and the salt and marinate during 30 minutes. Fry the onions lightly on a low fire in the frying-pan. Do not use butter or oil. Add some water if necessary to prevent burning or sticking. When the onions are done, add the berbere and fry shortly. Add the tegelese tesmi and fry this mixture for 5 minutes. Add the tomato paste, tomatoes skinned and sliced, garlic and ginger and simmer during 20 minutes on a low fire, stirring regularly to prevent sticking. Add some water and the pieces of chicken and simmer until the chicken is done. Add the eggs to the sauce shortly before serving. Serve with injera.

###

Equatorial Guinea
(recipe borrowed from the cooks at: www.celtnet.org.uk)

Five-Spice Roasted Guinea Hens

  • 3 tablespoons five-spice powder
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • Four 2 1/2-pound guinea hens, rinsed and patted dry

For the sauce:

  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • Zest of 1 1/2 navel oranges, removed in strips with a vegetable peeler
  • eight 1/4-inch-thick slices of fresh gingerroot, crushed lightly with the flat
  • 3 whole star anise
  • 2 1/2 cups chicken broth
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch, dissolved in 2 tablespoons cold water

For steamed broccoli rabe as an accompaniment:

  • 2 1/2 pounds broccoli rabe

Cooking Instructions:

In a small bowl stir together the five-spice powder and 2 tablespoons of the oil, rub the mixture on the guinea hens, and season the hens with salt. In a large heavy skillet heat the remaining 2 tablespoons oil over moderately high heat until it is hot but not smoking and in it brown the hens lightly, 1 at a time. Arrange the browned hens, breast side down, in 2 roasting pans and roast them in a preheated 350°F. oven, switching the pans from one rack to the other after 30 minutes, for 50 minutes to 1 hour, or until a meat thermometer inserted in the fleshy part of the thigh registers 170°F. Transfer the hens to a cutting board and let them stand, covered loosely with foil, for 15 minutes.

Make the sauce while the hens are standing: Skim the fat from the pan juices, divide the wine between the pans, and deglaze the pans over high heat, scraping up the brown bits. Transfer the mixture to a large saucepan, add the zest, the gingerroot, and the star anise, and boil the mixture until the liquid is reduced to about 1/3 cup. Add the broth, the water, and the soy sauce and cook the mixture at a slow boil for 5 minutes. Stir the cornstarch mixture, stir it into the zest mixture, and simmer the sauce for 2 minutes. Strain the sauce through a fine sieve into a saucepan and keep it warm. Carve the guinea hens, divide the broccoli rabe among 8 heated plates, and arrange the meat on it. Spoon some of the sauce over each serving and serve the remaining sauce separately.

To make steamed broccoli rabe: Trim and discard any yellow or coarse leaves and the tough stem ends from the broccoli rabe and wash the broccoli rabe well in several changes of cold water. In a steamer set over boiling water steam the broccoli rabe, covered, for 4 to 5 minutes, or until the stems are tender. Servings: 8

###

England
(recipe borrowed from the cooks at: www.nytimes.com and www.allrecipes.com)

Butternut Squash and Mushroom Wellington

  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1 small butternut squash (1 1/4 pounds), peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup
  • 1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
  • 1/8 teaspoon smoked sweet paprika or regular paprika
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, or more to taste
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 large shallot, finely chopped
  • 3/4 pound cremini mushrooms, trimmed and roughly chopped
  • 1/3 cup dry white wine
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • Flour
  • 1 (14-to-16-ounce) package puff pastry
  • 1 cup crumbled goat cheese
  • 1 egg, whisked with 1/2 teaspoon water.

1. Heat the oven to 400 degrees and line a large baking sheet with parchment.

2. In a very large skillet over high heat, melt 2 tablespoons butter. Add the squash in a single layer and cook, undisturbed, for 4 minutes. (If squash won’t fit in a single layer, cook it in batches). Stir and continue to cook until squash is golden, 7 to 10 minutes more. Stir in the syrup, thyme, paprika and 1/4 teaspoon salt; cook one minute. Scrape mixture into a bowl.

3. Turn the heat down to medium and melt the remaining butter in the skillet. Stir in garlic and shallot; cook 1 to 2 minutes. Add the mushrooms and remaining salt. Cook until mushrooms are soft and their juices evaporate, about 10 minutes. Stir in the wine and cook until the mixture is dry, about 5 minutes. Stir in the pepper and parsley. Taste and add more salt if needed.

4. On a lightly floured surface,

unwrap the puff pastry. Cut into 2 5-by-15-inch rectangles. Spread mushrooms on each pastry rectangle leaving 1/4-inch border. Spoon the cheese crumbles over the mushrooms. Then spoon the squash over the cheese, leaving a 1 1/2-inch border (it will look like a stripe of squash lying on a bed of cheese and mushrooms).

5. Brush the exposed borders of dough on each rectangle with the egg wash. Fold the long sides up to meet in the middle and pinch together to seal; pinch the ends, too. Transfer the pastries to the baking sheet and turn them over so that the seam is face down. Brush the tops with more egg wash. Bake until they are puffed golden, and firm to the touch, about 30 minutes. Let cool for 10 minutes, slice and serve.

Beef Vino Puff

  • 4 (4 ounce) beef tenderloin filets
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 shallot, minced
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic, or to taste
  • 1 cup Pinot Noir (or other semi-dry red wine)
  • 1 pinch garlic salt, or to taste
  • 1 pinch Italian seasoning, or to taste
  • 1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese, softened
  • 2 sheets frozen puff pastry, thawed
  • 1 egg white (optional)
  • 1/4 cup water (optional)

Directions:

Preheat oven’s broiler and set the oven rack about 6 inches from the heat source.

Place beef tenderloin filets in a broiler pan and broil until slightly browned but still very rare, about 2 minutes per side. Remove the filets and set aside to rest; reduce heat to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).

Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium heat and cook and stir shallot and garlic until the shallot is translucent, about 5 minutes.

Pour in Pinot Noir, bring to a boil, and cook until sauce is reduced by half, about 10 minutes, stirring often. Stir in garlic salt and Italian seasoning. Reduce heat to low.

Slowly stir cream cheese into the sauce until you get a creamy purple sauce. Remove the sauce from the heat.

Place puff pastry sheets on a work surface and cut each sheet in half crosswise.

Spoon a generous amount of sauce onto a puff pastry sheet half, and center a tenderloin filet onto the sauce.

Fold the puff pastry sheet over the steak and sauce, and press the edges all the way around to seal. Repeat with remaining steaks. Place the pastry-covered steaks onto a baking sheet.

Whisk the egg white and water in a bowl and brush the mixture over the tops of the pastry.

Bake in the oven until the pastry is browned and puffed and the steaks are the desired degree of doneness, about 25 minutes. An instant-read meat thermometer inserted into the center of the meat should read at least 145 degrees F (65 degrees C).

Banbury Tarts

  • 1 cup chopped dried figs
  • 1 egg
  • 2/3 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup chopped candied citron
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup chopped walnuts
  • 12 (5 inch) unbaked tart shells

Directions:  Chop the figs as fine as possible, measure to 1 cup, and pour boiling water over to cover. Allow to stand for 45 minutes. Drain very well. Beat the egg and sugar together. Stir in the figs, peel, raisins, and nuts. Fill tart shells 3/4 full with fruit filling. Bake at 375 degrees F (190 degrees C) for 20 to 25 minutes. Cool on racks.

###

El Salvador
(recipe borrowed from the cooks at: www.catholicreview.orgsouthamericanfood.about.com, and www.whats4eats.com)

Salvadorian-style Chicharrón – Chicharrón Salvadoreño

  • 3-5 pound pork butt
  • 1-2 cups salsa
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Black pepper
  • tortillas to serve

Preparation:  Cut the pork into several large pieces and place the meat in the slow cooker with 1 cup salsa, the cumin, salt, and pepper to taste. Cook on low for 6-8 hours (or 4 hours on high) or until pork is fork tender. Remove pork from slow cooker, reserving liquid, and shred finely with fork or using a food processor (fitted with the plastic blade). Place shredded pork and reserved liquid in a large skillet and saute until liquid evaporates and pork starts to brown slightly. Stir in remaining salsa until desired consistency. For making pupusas, add pork and salsa back to food processor, fitted with metal blade, and process with short pulses until finely ground.

Casamiento

  • 2 Tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 bell pepper, finely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 can black beans, drained, liquid reserved
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 2 cups cooked rice

Directions:  Heat oil in a large pot. Add the onions, bell pepper, and garlic. Sauté for two to three minutes, until tender. Stir in the drained beans, some of the bean liquid, and salt and pepper. Cook at medium-low until heated through. Add rice and stir until cooked through. Adjust seasoning and add a little more bean liquid if necessary. Serve hot.

Salsa Roja

  •     Olive oil — 3 tablespoons
  •     Onion, chopped — 1/4 cup
  •     Garlic, chopped — 1 clove
  •     Serrano or jalapeño chile pepper, chopped — 1
  •     Tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped — 2 cups
  •     Dried oregano — 2 teaspoons
  •     Salt and pepper — to taste
  •     Cilantro (optional), chopped — 1/4 cup

Method:
Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium flame. Add the onion, garlic and chile and sauté for 2 to 3 minutes, or until the onion is translucent.
Stir in the tomatoes and oregano and simmer for about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and cool a bit.
Puree the tomato sauce in a blender until smooth, adding a little water if needed. Add salt and pepper to taste, stir in cilantro if using and serve.

Flan de Leche (Latin caramel custard)

  • Sugar — 1 cup
  • Water — 1/4 cup
  • Eggs, beaten — 4
  • Sweetened, condensed milk — 1 (14-ounce) can
  • Whole milk or water — 2 cups
  • Vanilla — 1/2 teaspoon
  • Sugar — 1/2 cup

Method

  • Preheat oven to 350°F. Place the 1 cup sugar and water in a heavy-bottomed saucepan and stir to dissolve the sugar. Place over medium heat and boil the sugar, without stirring, until it just starts to turn a honey brown, around 10-15 minutes.
  • Remove the caramelized sugar from heat and pour into a 9-inch cake pan or in equal amounts into each of 6 individual ramekins, swirling to coat the bottom. You may not need all the sugar. Place the cake pan or ramekins in a baking pan large enough to hold them without touching.
  • In a large bowl, beat together the eggs, condensed milk, whole milk or water, vanilla and 1/2 cup sugar until smooth. Pour into the cake pan or into each of the ramekins.
  • Fill the baking pan with enough warm water to come about 2/3 of the way up sides of the containers. Place in the oven and cook until a knife inserted into the center of the custard comes out clean, anywhere from 45 minutes to over an hour. Do not overcook your flan or it may curdle.
  • Remove the custard(s) from the water bath and chill well. Run a knife around the edges of the custard, invert over a serving dish and serve.

Variations

  • Flan de Café (Coffee flan): add 3-4 teaspoons of instant coffee granules to the milk-egg mixture.
  • Flan de Coco (Coconut flan): substitute 2 cups of coconut milk for the sweetened condensed milk. Or simply stir 1/2 cup shredded coconut into the milk and egg mixture.
  • Flan de Piña (Pineapple flan): Makes 4 servings. Caramelize the sugar and pour into containers as above. For the liquid, boil one cup of pineapple juice with 1 cup of sugar until the sugar is dissolved and the liquid is reduced to about 1 cup. Allow the the juice to cool, then beat in 4 eggs until smooth. Pour into individual ramekins and proceed with the recipe. Popular in Puerto Rico.
  • Pumpkin Flan: increase to 5 eggs and add 1 cup pureed pumpkin, 1 teaspoon of cinnamon and 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger.
  • The basic ratio for a custard is 1 egg to 1 cup liquid with sugar added to taste. The liquid used in most recipes varies widely and can be heavy cream, half-and-half, whole milk, sweetened condensed milk, evaporated milk or coconut milk. Mixing these liquids in different amounts is also common. Experiment to find the flavor and richness you like best.
  • For a richer, thicker flan, substitute one of the eggs with two egg yolks.
  • In Argentina, flan is often accompanied by dulce de leche.

###

Egypt
(recipes borrowed from the cooks at: www.whats4eats.com and www.allrecipes.com)

Kefta (Middle Eastern spiced meatballs)

  •     Ground lamb or beef, or a mixture of the two — 2 pounds
  •     Onion, minced — 1
  •     Fresh parsley or mint, finely chopped — 1/2 bunch
  •     Ground cumin — 1 tablespoon
  •     Cinnamon — 2 teaspoons
  •     Allspice (optional) — 1 teaspoon
  •     Salt and pepper — to season
  •     Oil — 1/4 cup

Method:

Place the ground beef or lamb, onion, herbs, spices, salt and pepper in a large bowl and knead together well. Wrap in plastic and chill for 1-2 hours to allow the flavors to mingle and make the meat easier to handle.

Form the meat mixture into balls, patties or ovals the size of a small egg.

Heat the oil in a skillet over medium flame and, working in batches, sauté the meatballs until browned on all sides and cooked through. Browned meatballs can also be finished in a 350ºF oven.

Serve as is or in pita bread as a sandwich with tzatziki sauce.

Variations:

  1.     Keftedes (Greece): add some breadcrumbs and a little red wine to the meat mixture.
  2.     Köfte (Turkey): add some breadcrumbs and form the meat into a sausage shape on skewers. Oil the meat well and grill over hot coals.
  3.     Before frying, you can roll the kefta in some flour and shake off the extra to help them brown.
  4.     Experiment with different seasonings–coriander, cayenne, sesame seeds.

Falafels

  •     1 (15 ounce) can chickpeas (garbanzo beans), drained and mashed with fork
  •     3/4 cup panko bread crumbs
  •     1 small unpeeled red potato, shredded
  •     1/4 cup diced red onion
  •     2 cloves garlic, crushed
  •     1 egg
  •     1 tablespoon olive oil
  •     1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro
  •     1 teaspoon lemon juice
  •     1 teaspoon ground cumin
  •     1/4 teaspoon salt
  •     1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  •     1/4 cup panko bread crumbs
  •     1 cup canola oil for frying

Directions:

Combine chickpeas, 3/4 cup panko bread crumbs, red potato, red onion, garlic, egg, 1 tablespoon olive oil, cilantro, 1 teaspoon lemon juice, cumin, salt, and black pepper in a large bowl.

Form mixture into 2-inch patties. Place 1/4 cup panko crumbs in a shallow bowl. Gently press patties into the crumbs to coat.

Heat canola oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.

Fry patties in the hot oil until golden brown, about 4 minutes per side. Set patties aside.

Tzatziki Sauce

  •     8 ounces plain yogurt
  •     2 tablespoons olive oil
  •     1 tablespoon lemon juice
  •     1/2 teaspoon salt
  •     1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  •     1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill
  •     3 cloves pressed garlic

###

Ecuador
(recipes borrowed from the cooks at: www.food.com)

Slow Cooked Lamb Shanks (Seco De Chivo)

  • 4 lamb shanks
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 24 ounces beer (or 12 ounces beer & 12 ounces water)
  • 1 bunch fresh cilantro leaves , washed well
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons brown sugar (I use brown sugar Splenda)
  • 1 large onion , chopped
  • 3 medium tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons ketchup
  • 1 carrot
  • 1/2 stalk celery
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon cumin powder

Directions:

1    Brown meat and onion in olive oil. Remove meat to slow cooker or heavy dutch oven.

2    Place onion, tomatoes, cilantro, carrot, celery, garlic, brown sugar, ketchup, seasonings & beer in food processor. Process until everything is thick puree consistency.

3    Pour beer mixture over the lamb and cook at low heat for 2-3 hours if stove-top. If you are using the oven, 325 degrees for 2-3 hours. If using a crockpot, cook on low for 4-6 hours, depending on size of the shanks.

Mango, Avocado and Arugula Salad

Spicy orange vinaigrette

  • 1 tablespoon champagne vinegar
  • 4 tablespoons orange juice , about 1/2 orange
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice , about 1/2 lime
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped cilantro
  • 1 red chili peppers or 1 hot pepper , sliced
  • salt and pepper

Salad

  • 1/2 red onion , sliced
  • 6 cups arugula leaves
  • 1 mango , peeled and cut into long slices
  • 1 avocado , peeled and sliced
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice

Directions:

1    Combine all the ingredients for the salad dressing in a jar, close it tight and shake until the ingredients are well mixed.

2    Soak the onion slices in warm water with a dash of salt and 1 tbs lime juice for about 10 minutes.

3    Rinse and drain the onions slices.

4    Toss the arugula leaves with half of the vinaigrette.

5    Add the avocado slices, mango slices and onion slices to the arugula mix, drizzle the remaining vinaigrette on top.

6    Serve immediately.

###


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: