Tag Archives: coconut

Kuwait…

Thursday, September 5 – 

So… I got a new job. Hooray! And I got married. Extra, super hooray! But that means that I fell behind on writing my posts… again. Woops!

Kuwait (1)

 

Other than that, here are the photos. That’s all I’ve got for now. You know, since it was over a month ago. So enjoy the photos!I promise this happened. Yes, over a month ago. But it did! Mistress Whiskey and BestieExtraordinarie hosted the dinner. Their housemates helped cook, clean, and host everyone. We even had a birthday party thrown in on top.

Kuwait
(recipe borrowed from the cooks at: www.nestle-family.com)

  • 25 baby zucchini or 2 kg
  • ½ cup basmati rice or 100 g
  • 250 g minced beef
  • 4 tablespoons ghee, melted
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1/3 cup fresh parsley or 25 g, chopped
  • 1/3 cup coriander leaves or 25 g, choppedKuwait (2)
  • 1/3 cup fresh dill or 25 g, chopped
  • 1 small onion or 100 g, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, mashed
  • 1 medium tomato or 150 g, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons raisins
  • ¼ teaspoon white ground pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ¼ teaspoon ground turmeric
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 kg chicken wings
  • 5 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 cubes MAGGI® Chicken BouillonKuwait (4)
  • 12 cups water or 3 liters

Preparation:
Hollow zucchini and wash well. Soak rice in water for half an hour then strain. Mix rice, meat, ghee, salt, parsley, raisins, coriander, dill, chopped onion, garlic, chopped tomatoes, and spices in a mixing bowl. Stuff zucchini with the rice mixture and keep 1cm empty from the top. Heat oil in pot and fry chicken wings for 3 minutes or until they become golden in color. Add tomato paste and MAGGI® Chicken Bouillon cubes then. Remove from heat. Place stuffed zucchini carefully in a pot, side by side. Secure zucchini with a plate on top. Add water and bring to boil then simmer on low heat for 1 hour 30 minutes or until zucchini are well cooked.KuwaitKuwait (5)


Kiribati…

Friday, August 9 –

Tell you what, changing the blog from every week to every other week probably saved the entire project. I’m back to looking forward to it and hope that you are too!photo(26)

For this dinner we had Mr. Hero, WingWoman, BestestFianceEver, and yours truly. Eventually CoinSlot and MoneyShot showed up too.

I made the three lobster tails exactly as it is written below (thawed, cut, cracked, pulled from the shell, placed on top, then baked). I also made the sauce as written, but probably with a little bit more curry powder. On the side I caramelized some onions and cooked some white rice. WingWoman brought some rockfish and we salted and peppered them, putting them into the oven at the same time as the lobster. Everything turned out pretty good. People were generally fans of changing the typical melted butter for the lobster to the sauce. It had a little bit of a kick but not too much for the not-too-spicy people. Overall, the dinner was a win.

Now that I’m working on making the blog better I have a new rule that I’m going to try to stick with, which is no more than six people to any dinner. It will keep the timing of the meals easier and the overall cost down. So if you’re interested in one of the meals, speak up before your chance is gone! And if you want to host a dinner at your house, it’s up to you to set how many people are invited.

Looking forward to Korea! Cheers!

Kiribati
(recipe borrowed from the cooks at: http://globaltableadventure.com)

Roasted Lobster Tails with Coconut Curry Dipping Sauce

  • 4 Australian lobster tails (frozen)
  • vegetable oil
  • 1 14 oz can coconut milk
  • 1 1/2 tsp homemade curry powder
  • salt

Method:  How to make a fancy lobster tail at home: Thaw tails overnight in the refrigerator. Preheat the oven to 375F. (1) Then, using kitchen shears, cut each one down the back, stopping at the last segment before the tail piece. (2) Take hands and bend back the tail until you hear a loud crack. Run fingers between the meat and the bottom membrane, freeing tail meat from the shell. (3) Pull meat up and over the shell, pressing the shell shut beneath it. (4) The tail meat can thus piggyback on top of the shell. Give it the lobster meat a generous coating of oil. Bake for 1 1/2 minutes per ounce of weight. TIP: Have the fishmonger tell you what each tail weighs (or wrap them up separately so the tag will tell you). My tails weren’t all the same size, so I just took the smaller ones out first so as not to overcook them. Meanwhile, whisk together curry powder in a small saucepan with the coconut milk and salt. I used light coconut milk, but you can go as rich as you’d like. Cook until hot. To finish off this meal, serve the curry mixture on the side, instead of butter. Serve with rice.


Indonesia…

Wednesday, April 11 –

Did I mention that I am not very good at measuring spices and sauces and stuff? This dinner was a prime example of that, in the best way possible. I took the recipes below and made them me-ified. I will try to photo(9)recreate for you what we did. Thank you to WingWoman and LightsOn for hosting and grilling this amazing dinner!

Chicken – I cut two breasts into thin strips so that they cook evenly and quickly (no one likes raw chicken). The marinade was coconut milk (about a tablespoon), water (about 1/8 of a cup), red curry paste (about two tablespoons), and brown sugar (about 1-1/2 tablespoons).

Shrimp – WingWoman thawed them and put them in the marinade. Fortunately they were already shelled and cleaned. The marinade was tamari, honey, sriracha, garlic, and sweet WingWoman love.

Lamb – I used cubed stewing lamb meat. The marinade was Ketjap Mani (Indonesian sweet soy sauce, about half a cup), garlic (two chopped cloves), ginger (grated root, length of about an inch), brown sugar (about a tablespoon), and lemon juice (half a lemon).

Veggies – I used bell pepper, onion, zucchini, and mushrooms. The marinade was tamari (I just poured and stirred the veggies until it looked right), hot chili paste (about three tablespoons), lemon grass (one fresh stalk, chopped), and garlic (three chopped cloves).

Rice – WingWoman put rice, water, coconut milk, red curry paste, and peas in the rice cooker.

Dessert – Fresh mango!

As you can see, it wasn’t very well measured. But goodness, was it good! LightsOn did all of the barbequing and they turned out fabulously. We ate like blog-kings! I think I need this dinner on the menu once a month. Mmmhmm!

Indonesia
(recipe borrowed from the cooks at: www.indochef.com)photo(10)

Indonesian Sate’s

  • 500 gr. of Beef, Pork or Chicken

Marinade:

  • 1 Onion
  • 1 Garlic clove
  • 30 ml Dark Soya sauce
  • 1 teaspoon Coriander powder
  • 1 teaspoon Lemon Grass
  • 1 teaspoon Hot Chilli paste
  • 1 glass red wine (optional)
  • 30 ml water

Preparation:  Dice the meat in to 2 cm square cubes and put onto bamboo skewers (about 4 per stick). Combine all the marinade ingredients into a food processor and make into a smooth paste. Poor this over the prepared sate’s and leave to marinade for at least 2 hours. Cook the sate’s on the barbecue or under the grill for 5 -10 min. until done and serve with hot Peanut Sauce.

Babi Kecap

  • 500 gr Tender Pork
  • 1 large Onion
  • 2 Garlic cloves
  • 3 cm fresh Ginger
  • 30 gr dark sugar
  • ½ cup Ketjap Manis
  • 2 cups Water
  • Lemon juice
  • 1 stock cube
  • Pepper & Salt

Preparation:  Finely dice Onion, Garlic and Ginger. Cut Pork into strips. Add Sugar, Pepper and Salt. Fry in small saucepan until Onion is soft and the pork is dark. Add the Ketjap Manis (sweet Indonesian soya sauce) and water, Lemon juice and stock cube and leave to simmer on a low flame for about 30 min.


French Polynesia…

Saturday, November 3 –

This dinner was much less orchestrated, much less planned, and workout out just fine anyway. We decided to combine BigMan’s birthday with this dinner so everyone could get together, and in the chaos of our Halloween party I told A LOT of people about it. But I had no idea who would really show up. So I just picked one dish and let the rest happen by itself.

The people who showed up were: BestestFianceEver, Hot Momma (wine), Mr. Hero (birthday cake, plates, ice, rum, and sodas), BigMan, MissingMan, WingWoman (squash coconut soup),  LightsOn, ChinUp (Tahiti-style Mahi Mahi), MyBuddy (Coconut Vanilla Prawns), and I cooked Polynesian pork ribs and rice and provided some wine.

These ribs were the easiest thing in the world to make. I bought four pounds of pork ribs (the meaty kind), cut them apart to fit better then added two chopped onions, six minced garlic cloves, and a whole can of crushed pineapple. I set it to cook on low in my crock pot for eight hours. By the time I came back to it, the meat had fallen completely off the bones and it smelled heavenly. So I drained the liquid into a bowl, thinking I might need it, then pulled all the loose bones out, and put it back into the pot. It looked like chunky pulled-pork.

Into a small bowl went one and a half cups of ketchup, six tablespoons brown sugar, six tablespoons of hoisin sauce, and a chopped up length of ginger that was about the size of my thumb, just a little thicker. I left the chop pretty course so that we would get little sparks of ginger along the way. (My mouth is drooling right now thinking about it…) I dumped this mix on top, mixed it altogether, turned it on high for about 45 minutes, came back and it was sticky, lumpy, and delicious.

The mahi mahi was pretty good, but it would have been better if we could have served it right away. We had to wait for everyone to show up so it had dried out a little. The coconut vanilla prawns were soupy and sweet – not the way I prefer my seafood. I want my seafood to be savory or spicy. So it was ok, but I personally didn’t like them much. The squash coconut soup was bland at first. Then we added more salt, pepper, chili powder, and, of course, bacon. Because all squash soups (in my humble opinion, anyway) deserve a little smoky, salty bacon to round off the flavor.

All in all it was a successful, friend-, rum-, and wine-filled evening. Thanks to everyone who showed up for BigMan’s birthday!

Next up – G countries!

Polynesian Pork Ribs

  • 2 lbs boneless country-style ribs
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 small onion, sliced
  • 8 ounces crushed pineapple, undrained

Sauce:

  • 3/4 cup ketchup
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce
  • 1 teaspoon ginger root, grated

Cooking Instructions:  Spray slow cooker with nonstick cooking spray. Place pork ribs, garlic and onion in slow cooker. Spoon about half of the pineapple with some of the juice over ribs. Reserve remaining pineapple and juice. Cover; cook on low setting for 8 to 10 hours. About 35 minutes before serving, drain and discard cooking juices from slow cooker; wipe edge of cooker clean. In small bowl, combine ketchup, brown sugar, hoisin sauce, ginger root and remaining pineapple with juice; mix well. Spoon or pour evenly over ribs. Increase heat setting to high; cover and cook an additional 25 to 30 minutes or until ribs are glazed. Servings: 6


French Guiana…

Thursday, October 25 –

There was a point in time in this project that it was quite often just BestestFianceEver and BestieExtraordinaire and me. I missed it… a lot. Last night it was finally just the three of us over hot food, red wine, and juicy gossip. Could I have asked for more? Nope, I don’t think so.

This meal was just one pot and the rice cooker, with a bunch of dishes to hold the mise-en-place (mise-en-place being all of the little dishes that hold your cut-up veggies and meats before you’re ready to cook) as I set it all up. One eggplant, three small potatoes, one zucchini, six garlic cloves, one habanero, one lemon, four chicken breasts, one onion, and one shallot – that’s what I had chopped up. Yes, it’s a different ratio than what is below, but there were only three of us and there was still too much food left over.

Marinade first, with the shallot, garlic, coriander, vinegar, water, and spices. I couldn’t find “colombo spices” so I just added one teaspoon of each of the spices it says is in the combination, with the exception of ground rice. I used the full amount of garlic, coriander, and vinegar even though I cut the water and most of the veggies in half. Set that aside.

Onions, garlic, habanero, and oil were hot in the pan, cooking until they were softened. I left the seeds in because we are suckers for spicy food, especially on cold, fall days. In next went the chicken, but because I left the onion mixture in the pan the chicken cooked but didn’t get browned. Added next were the eggplant, zucchini, potatoes, lemon juice, the left-over marinade, and sprinkles of the herbs that make up herbes de provence. Then I added the coconut milk, and covered and cooked until the chicken was done, but the potatoes weren’t soft yet! So I had to continue to cook it, which dried the chicken out a little. It was still good to eat, it just wasn’t tender and juicy.

The sauce was spicy, but I felt like it needed more salt and pepper than I originally put in it. We drizzled a little of the remaining coconut milk on top to cool it down a little. Overall I’d give the dish a couple of stars, but it wasn’t terribly amazing.

BestieExtraordinaire brought wine and French Guiana’s typical dessert, mango sorbet. It was a perfect cap to a wonderful evening.

 

French Guiana
(recipe borrowed from the cooks at: www.easy-french-food.com/french-guiana-recipes.html)

Poulet Colombo

  • 1 chicken cut up, or 8 pieces of chicken
  • 1 shallot, peeled and chopped finely
  • 6 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed – divided
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • 1 cup water
  • 3 tablespoons colombo spices – divided (colombo contains coriander, turmeric, cumin, mustard, fenugreek, pepper, cloves, and rice)
  • 3 tablespoons oil
  • 2 onions, peeled and chopped
  • 1 hot pepper, minced finely (more or less to your taste)
  • 1 medium eggplant, cut in 1/2 inch cubes
  • 1 medium zucchini, cut in 1/2 inch cubes
  • 3 potatoes, cut in 1/2 inch cubes
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon herbes de Provence (or 1 teaspoon each dried thyme, rosemary, and basil)
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • salt and pepper
  • rice to serve
  • (mango sorbet for dessert)

Make a marinade by mixing the chopped shallot, 4 cloves of crushed garlic, ground coriander, vinegar, water, and 1 tablespoon of the colombo spices in a shallow dish. Salt and pepper the chicken pieces and place in marinade, turning to coat thoroughly. Place in the refrigerator for several hours or overnight.
After the chicken has marinated (save the marinade), heat the oil in a large and sturdy pot on medium heat. Add the chopped onions, minced hot pepper, and 2 more cloves of crushed garlic. Cook until the onion starts to soften – about 5 minutes.

Add the chicken and cook, turning occasionally, until the chicken is browned a bit on all sides – about 10 minutes. Add the cubed eggplant, zucchini, and potatoes, the lemon juice, the herbes de Provence (or substitute herbs), and the leftover marinade. Stir to combine well, cover and cook on low medium heat for 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes stir in the remaining 2 tablespoons of colombo and stir to combine well. Cover and cook another 15 to 25 minutes, or until the chicken is done as you like.

Stir in the coconut milk and season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve hot with rice.


Dominica…

Monday, July 23 –

I swear I’m trying to not fall behind on these posts… life keeps sweeping me away! This post was actually cooked last week. Thank you to RubsWithLove (strawberry cream pie), Mistress Whiskey (salad and wine), Bestie Extraordinaire (salad and wine), Wonderful Boyfriend, and NewOrleans (sinful mango dessert) for coming to this dinner and bringing wonderful dishes.

I decided to make this recipe by cooking the rice in a rice-cooker and cooking the seafood separately. This way I didn’t have to worry about over-cooking shrimp, which is gross. So into the pan went double the amounts of herbs and spices, double the amount of tomato paste, and triple the garlic. I let that warm up and then I put three pounds of shrimp in. I topped the mix off with veggie broth until it was sauce-like instead of paste-like. In next went the veggies, at about 1.5 times the amounts called for originally. I let that simmer until the shrimp were just barely done. I put the rice into a dish to serve, the shrimp mix into another dish, the olives into a dish, the avocados into a dish, and then I put lump crab meat into the final dish.

Onto our plates went the salad and dressing and then the rice and shrimp with whatever toppings sounded good to people. (How could you not want crab meat, after all?) The dinner was a perfect blend of spice, flavor, and texture. I likened it to etouffee at the time, and most everyone seemed to agree that was a close relation to this dish. I highly recommend it, and will look forward to making it again soon.

Our newest blog guest decided to take a trip to the store and buy something that inspired him. (Being a chef in real life has creativity perks that most people who love food envy.) He made a “coconut caramel cream mango flambe” and it was OUT OF CONTROL delicious. There is no photo of it, mostly because it disappeared so quickly into our bellies and also because it was one of those dishes that tasted amazing but didn’t look very pretty. I highly recommend finding a friend that likes to make food like this (unless you are trying to diet, in which case, run very, very far away!). Yum for all the dishes we ate this night!

Dominica
(recipe borrowed from the cooks at: www.caribbeanchoice.com)

Asopao de Mariscos (spiced shrimp with rice)

  •     2 lbs of shrimp, crab or lobster
  •     1 lemon (may be omitted)
  •     2 1/2 cups of rice
  •     3/4 gallon of water
  •     5 tablespoons oil
  •     4 tablespoons tomato paste
  •    1/4 cup chopped green peppers
  •     1 pinch oregano
  •     1 teaspoon mashed garlic
  •     1 pinch black pepper
  •     1/8 cup chopped seedless olives
  •     1/4 cup chopped celery
  •     1 spoon finely chopped parsley
  •     1 spoon finely chopped coriander
  •     1/2 spoon of thyme leaves
  •     1 cube of chicken stock
  •     Salt

METHOD / DIRECTIONS:

In an iron pot heat the oil (reserve 2 spoons of oil).  Add the herbs, olives, spices, tomato paste, peppers, garlic and salt. Add the shrimps and stir (be careful with hot oil splattering). Cover and wait two minutes, then stir again. Add the remaining water and bring to a boil. Add all remaining ingredients (including the rice). Stir regularly to avoid excessive sticking. Let 3/4 of the water evaporate, by then a grain of rice should be about 3 times its original size. Adjust salt to taste. Serve while hot.

RECIPE NOTES: Serve with a few slices of avocados or tostones.


Cook Islands…

Saturday, June 2 –

Dear Cook Islands, please be in my kitchen and my belly ALL of the time. You were probably the best fish recipe I have made for this entire project and one of the best I’ve ever made in my life. YUM.

I started with making the onion tart. I put it together just like the recipe said, with maybe a little bit extra of the Gruyere cheese because of the block that I got from the store. Into the oven it went and it smelled like heaven turning warm and bubbly. While that was cooking I put together a simple green salad and set that aside. Once everyone was ready for dinner I started on the fish. It was simple to coat the filets in the egg-mixture, then the coconut-mixture, and then into the pan with some oil. I cooked them until they were flaky but still moist.

Simple, heavenly, and delicious. I couldn’t have asked for a better meal. Just scroll down, copy the recipes, and make them soon. I promise you they won’t disappoint! The fish was flaky, sweet, and the topping was crumbly and had just enough spice to it. The onion tart was cheesy, warm, bubbly, and I had to move it away from my plate to stop eating it. And the salad was a perfect counter point of fresh veggie. Magnifique!

Now let me tell you about the drinks that we had. Two new guests for dinner joined us, Kid Kreole and Harvey Danger, and they brought something called “yucca”. Take a whole mound of lemons and squeeze the juice into a container. Add some of the rinds in with the juice. Add the juice of one orange. Add some bakers sugar. Add a whole fifth of golden tequila. Close the container and shake it continuously for several (maybe 5?) minutes. Pour into a glass and sip cautiously! It will be sweet, tart, smooth, and dangerously good. And you won’t even barely taste the tequila. Holy cow was it good!

And last, but not least, are the desserts for this dinner. Sassy Desserts hosted this dinner at her house (and let me make a mess of her kitchen!) and she made two different desserts. The first was sugared doughnuts, which actually gave her a little trouble in the beginning. When we showed up to her house, she had a batch of the dough sitting to rise. But it was super soupy, and didn’t look like it was going to get anywhere any time soon. So she made another batch with less liquid added and set it to keep warm on the warming part of her stove. The dough did get nice and fluffy while we were eating dinner, and the other just kind of stayed soupy. So we made doughnuts with the second batch of dough and man, were they good. Just like the little doughnuts you get at the carnival stands. I would recommend that you make these, but only if you have the self-control to stop after a few!

The second dessert was baked papayas. She peeled them, cut them in half, scooped out the seeds, covered them in sugar and baked them for the whole time the recipe says. Then you pour in coconut milk and let it get bubbly and then serve it. The flavor was… ok, but not really good. The texture was mushy and a little odd with the milk on top. It was interesting to try but I wouldn’t make it again.

Cook Islands
(recipes borrowed from the cooks at: www.tamarind.co.ck and www.foodbycountry.com)

Pan-fried Fish Coated with Coconut & Spices

  • 750g.(1 ½ lb.) fish fillets
  • ¼ cup milk
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • ½ cup flour
  • 1 cup grated coconut fresh, lightly toasted or desiccated coconut
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon chilli powder
  • 2 teaspoon garam masala or mild curry
  • ¼  teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • Oil for shallow frying.

Method: Cut fish in lengthwise pieces, around 10cm.x 4cm. (6”x2”) or similar.  Combine milk and egg, beating lightly till combined.  In a separate bowl mix together the flour with the coconut, salt, chilli powder, garam masala and pepper. Dip fish fillets in egg mixture, and then flour/coconut mixture, shaking off any excess.   Pour oil to about 2cm. (3/4”) deep in a frying pan, and cook fish on both sides till golden about 5 minutes a side. Fish can also be cooked in a deep-fryer.  Drain on kitchen paper.

Onion Tart

  • 1 quantity quiche pastry or short crust pastry, home-made or bought
  • 1 egg white, lightly beaten
  • 2 large onions, cut into quarters, then sliced very thin
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon flour
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 cup cream
  • 1½ cup milk
  • ½ teaspoon wholegrain or French mustard
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste
  • ½ teaspoon pepper
  • A few drops Tabasco
  • 1 cup grated Gruyere or Cheddar cheese 1 tablespoon Parmesan cheese

METHOD: Preheat oven to 200C (400F). Roll out pastry to fit 23cm (9”)) quiche or pie dish, prick the pastry all over with a fork, brush with egg white and chill while preparing filling. Cook onions in butter for about 10 minutes over a gentle heat, until very soft. Once the onions are soft, remove from heat and stir in the flour till well mixed in. Meanwhile beat together the eggs, cream, and milk with the mustard, parsley, salt, pepper and Tabasco. Put ½ cup Gruyere or Cheddar cheese into the pie dish, followed by the onions, then pour in the egg mixture & sprinkle remaining ½ cup cheese on top. Sprinkle with the Parmesan. Bake for 10 minutes, then reduce heat to 160C (325F) and cook a further 30 minutes or until set. Allow to cool slightly before cutting. Serve the tart with a crisp green salad.

Variation (Bacon & Onion Tart.) Cooked chopped bacon or ham can be added to the filling. Stir into onion mixture.

Firifiri (Tahitian Sugared Doughnuts)

  • 3 cups flour
  • 1 package dry yeast
  • 1½ to 2 cups water
  • 1 cup sugar
  • Peanut oil, for frying (another oil may be substituted)

Procedure

  1. Mix the flour and dry yeast. Add water and mix to form a soft dough.
  2. Add sugar and let rise 4 to 5 hours. Divide the dough into about 12 to 15 pieces.
  3. Pull them into “ropes” and twist to form figure eights.
  4. Fry in very hot peanut oil until golden. Roll in sugar after frying. Makes about 1 dozen.

Baked Papaya Dessert

  • 2 small ripe papayas, peeled, seeded, and cut in half lengthwise
  • ½ cup sugar
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1½ cups coconut milk (canned, bottled, or fresh; see recipe)

Procedure

  1. Preheat oven to 375°F.
  2. Place the papayas, cut side up, in a shallow baking dish.
  3. Sprinkle with the sugar and add the water.
  4. Bake uncovered in the middle of the oven for 1½ hours, or until the papayas are tender but still keep their shape.
  5. Every half hour, pull out the oven rack and baste the papayas with the liquid from the dish (pour it over them with a spoon).
  6. Raise the heat to 400°F and bake until the syrup gets thick and becomes the color of caramel, about 5 minutes.
  7. Turn off heat and pour the coconut milk into the center of the papayas.
  8. Leave them in the oven until the milk gets warm, about 5 minutes. Serve immediately, or refrigerate and serve cold. Makes 4 servings.