Tag Archives: fish

Kiribati…

Friday, August 9 –

Tell you what, changing the blog from every week to every other week probably saved the entire project. I’m back to looking forward to it and hope that you are too!photo(26)

For this dinner we had Mr. Hero, WingWoman, BestestFianceEver, and yours truly. Eventually CoinSlot and MoneyShot showed up too.

I made the three lobster tails exactly as it is written below (thawed, cut, cracked, pulled from the shell, placed on top, then baked). I also made the sauce as written, but probably with a little bit more curry powder. On the side I caramelized some onions and cooked some white rice. WingWoman brought some rockfish and we salted and peppered them, putting them into the oven at the same time as the lobster. Everything turned out pretty good. People were generally fans of changing the typical melted butter for the lobster to the sauce. It had a little bit of a kick but not too much for the not-too-spicy people. Overall, the dinner was a win.

Now that I’m working on making the blog better I have a new rule that I’m going to try to stick with, which is no more than six people to any dinner. It will keep the timing of the meals easier and the overall cost down. So if you’re interested in one of the meals, speak up before your chance is gone! And if you want to host a dinner at your house, it’s up to you to set how many people are invited.

Looking forward to Korea! Cheers!

Kiribati
(recipe borrowed from the cooks at: http://globaltableadventure.com)

Roasted Lobster Tails with Coconut Curry Dipping Sauce

  • 4 Australian lobster tails (frozen)
  • vegetable oil
  • 1 14 oz can coconut milk
  • 1 1/2 tsp homemade curry powder
  • salt

Method:  How to make a fancy lobster tail at home: Thaw tails overnight in the refrigerator. Preheat the oven to 375F. (1) Then, using kitchen shears, cut each one down the back, stopping at the last segment before the tail piece. (2) Take hands and bend back the tail until you hear a loud crack. Run fingers between the meat and the bottom membrane, freeing tail meat from the shell. (3) Pull meat up and over the shell, pressing the shell shut beneath it. (4) The tail meat can thus piggyback on top of the shell. Give it the lobster meat a generous coating of oil. Bake for 1 1/2 minutes per ounce of weight. TIP: Have the fishmonger tell you what each tail weighs (or wrap them up separately so the tag will tell you). My tails weren’t all the same size, so I just took the smaller ones out first so as not to overcook them. Meanwhile, whisk together curry powder in a small saucepan with the coconut milk and salt. I used light coconut milk, but you can go as rich as you’d like. Cook until hot. To finish off this meal, serve the curry mixture on the side, instead of butter. Serve with rice.


Jersey…

Friday, June 28 –

I was looking forward to this dinner pretty much since I started looking online for recipes. There are just so many amazing options to choose from. photo(24)

This dinner we had: BestieExtraordinaire and Mistress Whiskey (herb pancakes stuffed with chargrilled peppers and goat cheese), ChinUp and MyBuddy (fresh pea and tarragon tartlets), WingWoman (seasonal fruits with cream), TroubleWalking and ImpishSmile (wine), and BestestFianceEver and yours truly (white fish with orange glaze, barbecued sweet corn with a chili and honey butter, and wine).

Instead of tuna we decided to use cod to save a little bit of money. I put the slab of fish onto foil, poured the orange glaze sauce over the top, wrapped it up, and stuck it on the grill. Then we put the corn on the grill, shucked them, and then drizzled the chili honey butter on top. The stuffed pancakes were gluten free, but still pretty good. And the tart was a wonderful flavorful dish, bright with the peas and tarragon. For the dessert, WingWoman and I put strawberries, raspberries, and blueberries on a plate, then topped them with freshly whipped cream. Perfect for a hot summer night.

This was definitely one of the better dinners lately, and I’m glad that so many people could join us! Thank you!

Jersey
(recipes borrowed from the cooks at: www.ci-cooperative.com)

Albacore Tuna
This tuna is line caught by a Cornish boat off the coast of Spain. Apparently we have a quota there which is currently being fished. It is also known as longfin due to its long pectoral fins and it is tagged. It is a pinky grey colour with a flakier texture than yellow fin tuna. Cook as for yellow fin tuna, i.e. quickly in a hot pan. Do not poach.

Sauce:

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp orange juice
  • 1 tbsp orange marmalade
  • 1 teaspoon dried mixed herbs
  • salt and black pepper
  • fresh orange rind to garnish (optional)

In a large frying pan or shallow pan mix all the sauce ingredients. Bring to the boil then reduce the heat and add the fish. Cook for 6-8 minutes (depending on the thickness of the fish) turning once. Serve with noodles or rice.

Barbecued Sweet Corn with a Chili and Honey Butter

  • 4 sweetcorn, preferably still in the husk
  • Sunflower oil

For the flavored butter:

  • 100g (4oz) butter
  • 1 red chili, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated root ginger
  • 2 tablespoon finely chopped fresh coriander
  • 2 teaspoon honey
  • Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon or lime
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Leave the sweetcorn whole and soak in water for one hour before use. Place all the ingredients for the flavored butter in a food processor and whiz until smooth. Then either spoon the butter onto a sheet of cling film and roll it up into a sausage shape and chill for two hours or simply pile into a bowl and chill. When you are ready to cook and have the barbecue ready, pat the sweetcorn dry and brush the husks with a little oil. Cook over a moderate heat turning until patched brown on all sides. Sweetcorn without husks can be cooked wrapped in buttered kitchen foil. It will take about 20 minutes. When cooked, remove the foil or peel back the husk and serve with thin slices of the chilled flavored butter on top of the hot corn.


Japan…

Monday, June 17 –

Have you had sushi before? Yes? Ok, whew. Then you probably know that the fish is best when it might still wiggle. Other than that all you need is a little sushi rice, some seaweed, soy sauce, wasabi, and hunger.

This dinner was just BestestFianceEver, RubsWithLove, Sir VJ, and yours truly. Sir VJ and rubs with love brought several different kinds of fish, eel, sushi rice, pickled ginger, and some sushi-making skills. BestestFianceEver and I brought a huge slab of ahi tuna, edamame, avocado, gyoza and sauce, cucumber, and wasabi. Sir VJ actually did most of the work with the fish, slicing, rolling, and putting it altogether on platters. The rest of us helped when we could and got out of the way when we couldn’t.

There was SO MUCH FOOD. And it was so good, I can’t even begin to tell you. Thanks, you two, for making Japan so wonderful and memorable!

photo 3photo 4photo 2photo 1photo 5


Ivory Coast…

Monday, June 10 –

I knew that this dinner was sneaking up. And I knew that I hadn’t made eggplant in a while, so I decided to go for it. When it got to the day-of, though, it just didn’t sound good. Not only that but boiling it to a paste photo(23)sounded like a terrible idea. (I haven’t ever tried it, however, so I could be wrong.) So instead, since it was just BestestFianceEver and I, I decided to change it up a little bit.

I cut up a quarter of an onion, a quarter of a yellow bell pepper, a quarter of an orange bell pepper, and a quarter of an eggplant. I heated up a little oil in the bottom of a pan, threw the veggies in, sprinkled them with salt and pepper, then dusted them lightly with cumin and turmeric. I let the veggies start to soften and then I pushed them to the side of the pan in a circle, added a little bit more oil to the middle of the pan, and then put the fish on the oil. Once the fish was flaky I put the rice on the plate, the fish next to the rice, and the veggies over the whole thing. BestestFianceEver made us a couple of green salads to go with it (hey, it’s summer and the veggies are perfect, so how could we not have a salad?)

I am really glad that I added just a little bit more flavor to the dish. It was ok, but it definitely could have used more. I picked cod for the fish, which turned out nice and flaky. Not one of my favorite dinners, but not bad!

Ivory Coast
(recipe borrowed from the cooks at: www.celtnet.org.uk)

Poisson Sauce Aubergines (Fish and Eggplant Sauce)

  • 1kg mixed fish fillets
  • 500g aubergines, sliced
  • 300g bell peppers, sliced into strips
  • 100g onions, sliced
  • 250ml oil
  • 400g rice, washed and drained
  • salt and freshly-ground black pepper

Method: Heat the oil in a casserole dish. Add the fish and onions, and fry until well browned all over. At this point add the aubergine and bell pepper slices. Season to taste with salt and black pepper then pour over 2l water. Bring the mixture to a boil, reduce to low simmer, cover and cook gently for 60 minutes. Remove the fish and set aside to keep warm. Strain the stock and set aside. Mash the vegetables in the casserole and add enough of the reserved stock to make a sauce. Pour into a bowl and set aside. Pour the remaining stock into the casserole, add the rice, bring to a simmer, cover and cook for about 20 minutes, or until the rice is tender. Serve the fish on a bed of the rice and accompany with the aubergine sauce.


Iceland…

Monday, March 25 –

Another dinner with a ton of people, how exciting! We had: LostBoy, RubsWithLove, Sir VJ (salad), ChinUp, MyBuddy (caramelized potatoes), OurCuz (wine), BestestFianceEver, and yours truly (fried halibut and bread). photo(7)

We bought 2.3 pounds of halibut, fresh from Central Market. I cut the slab of fish into pieces approximately 2″ square. I figured it would be easier for people to portion control that way. I mixed the flour, salt, and pepper in a shallow bowl and rolled the pieces of fish in the flour mixture. I melted a stick of butter in a large pan (medium high) and I fried the pieces of fish in the hot butter. It took me two batches, the last batch smaller than the first batch, so I added chopped onion to the second batch. After I pulled the last of the fish pieces out and set them on a plate with a paper towel; I covered them with foil until the onions were browned and beautiful from frying in the butter.

Dinner was served – fish fried in butter, onions fried in butter, caramelized potatoes, and a salad with strawberries, gorgonzola, almonds, and balsamic dressing. (We couldn’t find a real salad recipe from Iceland, but it does say to serve it with one in the recipe, so I told them to wing it with whatever sounded good.)

The salad was crisp and bright with sweet strawberries. The fish was light and flaky, with only a little bit of the butter flavor lingering. The potatoes kind of tasted like doughnuts and kind of like potatoes. Not bad, but not my favorite. The food was on plates and then disappeared into bellies so fast that I almost missed everyone actually eating it. I think from the silence while the food was being devoured that it was a pretty darn good dinner.

All of the dinner ideas for the I, J, and K countries are up over here. Don’t be shy, come have dinner with us!

Iceland
(recipes borrowed from the cooks at: www.isholf.is)

Lúðubuff – Fried Halibut Steaks

  • 1 1/2 kg. halibut (or turbot, sole or other flat fish)
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 150 gr. oil, butter or margarine
  • 4 tbsp. flour
  • 1/3 tsp. ground pepper
  • 100 gr. onion

Take one small, whole halibut. Cut off the head, tail and fins. Scrape off the slime and loose scales under cold, running water. Cut the fish into slices, about as thick as your thumb is wide. Mix together flour, salt and pepper. Coat the slices with flour mixture and fry in the hot fat until done (3-4 minutes on each side). Remove from the pan and arrange the steaks on a serving dish. Slice the onions and brown in the fat, remove and put on top of the fish. Pour some water on the frying pan, roll it around and pour over the fish. Serve with cooked potatoes, green salad and lemon wedges.
-Try grilling the fish steaks: cut into large cubes and thread onto skewers with onion pieces, fresh mushrooms and pieces of red bell pepper (capsicum).

Brúnaðar kartöflur – Caramelized potatoes

  • 1 kg. cooked potatoes (preferably red)
  • 50 g. butter/margarine
  • 50 g. sugar

Potatoes should preferably be cold, but it is not necessary. They should be small and even sized. If they are too big, cut into smaller pieces, flush with water and pat dry. Put the sugar on a medium hot frying pan. When it starts to brown, add the butter and stir to mix. Lower temperature and add potatoes. Roll the potatoes around to coat evenly. The caramel covering should be soft. Serve hot, for example with the Sunday roast. Caramelized potatoes are also good with all kinds of pork, especially smoked.


Haiti…

Sunday, March 10 –

I’m not entirely sure why I got so lazy with this dinner, maybe because it was just the two of us, but because of my corner-cutting it turned out… well… strong. And salty. Very, very, very, very, very salty. photo(11)

Bestest fiance ever started the bacon cooking (three sliced, chopped into large-ish bits) and when they were mostly crispy I put the onion and a half cup of canned kidney beans in the pan with the bacon and drippings. I let that cook until the onion was starting to soften and then I added the cloves, garlic, pepper, cubes, and salt. Because I used canned beans I only had a little bit of the liquid it comes in, so I decided to top the rest off with vegetable broth. Because I used the bacon fat, I didn’t need the vegetable oil. And because I didn’t read the directions all the way down, I chopped the habanero up and threw that in as well. On top went the rice. I let that come up to a boil, put the lid on, and turned it down to low and let it simmer for 20 minutes. After tasting the resulting rice dish, which honestly had great flavor as long as you don’t mind that your mouth almost imploded with saltiness. Really, I should have known that broth plus bouillon cubes plus bacon plus salt would be too much, I just didn’t think that far ahead. But I will totally keep this on my list to make again, minus the crazy amount of salt that I unknowingly subjected us to.

The salmon, on the other hand, was simple and delicious. I got one 3/4 pound filet, put it in a baking dish and poured on a mix of the lemon juice, wine, and onion dressing (about a quarter cup of each). I sliced some red onion and red bell pepper and put them in the baking dish as well. Put it into the 375* oven and baked it for 20 minutes. It came out flavorful (and not salty at all, which totally saved our dinner) and delicious. The onion dressing was a neat way of cheating to get those flavors together, but I honestly prefer using spices and minced onion instead.

All in all, it was pretty ok. I’m not sure I’m brave enough to use the rice for leftovers, but I will try!

Haiti
(recipes borrowed from the cooks at: www.everythinghaitian.com)

Riz National (Rice and Beans)

  • 2 cups Long Grain Rice
  • 1/2 cup Dried Red Kidney Beans
  • 3 cups Water kidney beans was boiled in
  • 1/4 lb Salt Pork or Bacon
  • 2 Chicken bouillon cubes (Maggi)
  • 1 1/2 Tsp Salt
  • 6-8 Whole Cloves
  • 1/4 Tsp Ground Black Pepper
  • 1/2 cup Finely Diced White Onion
  • 1/4 cup Vegetable Oil
  • 1 Whole Habanero or Scotch Bonnet pepper (optional)
  • 3 cloves     Garlic, peeled and crushed

Instructions: Bring dried beans to boil in 8 cups of water. Cook until tender, but shape remains. Do not overcook. Strain beans and put bean water aside. Sauté salt pork or bacon, spices, and beans in oil, until beans are crispy. Add salt, cloves, and black pepper. Add 3 cups of bean water and heat to boiling. Add rice, bouillon cubes, and hot pepper to boiling liquid. Once water has evaporated, remove whole pepper and mix in 1 Tbsp of butter. Cover pot tightly and continue cooking on low heat ( approx. 20 minutes) until done.

Saumon Grille (Grilled Salmon)

  • 3 Lbs. Fresh Salmon Steaks
  • 1/4 cup Lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup White Wine
  • 4 Tbsp Butter, melted
  • 1/2 cup Vidalia Onion Dressing
  • 1 Medium Red Onion, sliced
  • 1 Red Bell Pepper, Julienne
  • To taste Fresh Ground Black Pepper

Instructions:  Place Salmon Steaks in a large bowl, and pour lemon juice. Clean Salmon thoroughly and rinse in cold water. Place clean Salmon in an oven, proof dish.  Add Wine, Vidalia Onion Dressing, and black pepper. Mix well and refrigerate for 1/2 hour. Pour 1/2 of melted butter on Salmon Steaks. Bake in preheated 375 F oven for 20 minutes or until golden brown. Turn them over and pour remaining butter, bake until golden brown. Add Onion and Red Bell Pepper and mix.


Guyana…

Friday, March 1 –

Fish wrapped in bacon – what could be more delicious? I chose to use halibut because I love the flavor and the texture of it, but I’m sure you could wrap any kind of fish in bacon and be happy with the results. I also photo(10)wrapped portobello mushroom slices in bacon just for fun. Then I sprinkled salt and pepper and squeezed lemon juice over the top of everything. Arranged on a foil-lined baking sheet, I put them into the 350* oven for about 15-20 minutes. Just long enough for the fish to flake apart when tested with a fork. I served the fish and mushroom heaven with a green salad and this cilantro habanero rice recipe.

There wasn’t a scrap of fish or mushroom left after BestestFianceEver, Hot Momma, Wingwoman, BabyBear, and I were done with our plates. I could have probably even made more (I made 12 oz of fish, 2 portobellos cut into slices, 1 lemon, and 1 pound of bacon), but fortunately for our waistlines I didn’t. I highly recommend this way of cooking fish! YUM!

Guyana
(recipe borrowed from the cooks at: www.islandflave.com)

Bacon Fish Rolls

  • 8 Slices of Bacon
  • 8 small fillets of fish
  • Salt and pepper
  • Lemon juice
  • Parsley
  • Rice to serve

Directions:  Roll 1 slice of bacon around one fish fillet and secure with toothpick. Sprinkle salt and pepper over the fish roll. Squeeze some lemon juice. Repeat steps 1 – 3 for each fish fillet. Bake on a greased pan at 350 degrees for about 20 – 30 minutes. Garnish with parsley.